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The Delaware Company (standing firing, kneeling firing), American Continental Line Infantry, The Battle of Cowpens, January 17, 1781, The American War of Independence, 1775–1783--two figures
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John Jenkins Designs

Item Number: CWDEL-03

The Delaware Company (standing firing, kneeling firing), American Continental Line Infantry, The Battle of Cowpens, January 17, 1781, The American War of Independence, 1775–1783

CONTINENTAL LINE INFANTRY
THE DELAWARE COMPANY

The main core of Morgan’s flying Army was a battalion of veteran Continentals. Three companies of the Maryland Line, and one company from Delaware. These were highly trained and disciplined, and formed the main line commanded by John Eager Howard. They were the best troops to engage in prolonged close combat with British regulars.

The Delaware Company was especially highly regarded, and most were survivors from the Battle of Camden.  Their commander, Captain Robert Kirkwood, was also well regarded.  Their full regimental issued uniforms were dark blue with red facings, cuffs, and turn backs.  Waistcoats were white and more durable buckskins replaced the white cotton breeches, and they wore cocked hats trimmed with yellow braid.  A black metal cannister which held forty extra cartidges was also added.

In October 1780, North Carolina, from its meagre stores, furnished the men of the Delaware company with new shoes, a hunting shirt, and blue striped ticking overalls.  This was the uniform worn at Cowpens and subsequent actions, at Guilford Court House, Hobkirk’s Hill, the Siege of Ninety Six, and Eutaw Springs.

The Battle of Cowpens was an engagement during the American Revolutionary War fought on January 17th 1781, near the town of Cowpens, South Carolina, between American forces under Brigadier General Daniel Morgan, and British forces under Lieutenant Colonel Banastre Tarleton, as part of the campaign in the Carolinas.  The battle was a turning point in the American reconquest of South Carolina from the British.

Tarleton’s force of 1,000 British troops were set against 2,000 troops under Morgan.  Morgan’s forces suffered casualties of only 25 killed and 124 wounded.  Tarleton’s force was almost completely eliminated with almost 30% casualties and 55% of his force captured or missing, with Tarleton himself and only about 200 British troops escaping.

Morgan’s forces conducted a double envelopment of the British forces, the only double envelopment of the war.

Due to be released in DECEMBER 2023.